self-motivation

Gig workers on the rise

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Teamwalking1You’ve no doubt seen them, those nomads wandering around with laptops or tablets, coffee shop warriors hogging that comfortable settee you had your eye on.

The new word for these freelancers is gig worker. Now when I get a gig I’m expected to take my guitar but that’s another story.

I wrote about the gig economy a year ago when the term had replaced portfolio working and was no longer just about consultants and trainers but about a whole range of people seeking flexibility and control over their work.

It seems that the trend is continuing with parents wanting to work around school hours at the same time as companies wanting more flexibility in managing their head count.

According to the Association of Independent Professionals and the Self-employed there are 1.6 million freelancers in the UK.

And according to a survey of knowledge workers by a software company just over half of them now work in virtual teams and most of those believe it is more effective than working face-to-face. In addition half of them would consider freelance work if it were offered to them.

The office is clearly becoming increasingly less important, and maybe less attractive due to the travel and daily hassles it can entail. Working from home is becomes more popular, perhaps in an effort to improve work-life balance, but is not for everyone. Whether it’s more productive is a different matter.

Matt Roberts, CEO at Touch Networks,  says “People want greater autonomy and a better work-life balance, while companies want consultation from people with diverse skill sets and experience“.

He says 40% of Americans will be self-employed by 2020 and he thinks the UK is heading the same way. Here there is a North-South divide with most freelancers based in the South East (22%), Greater London (21%), and South-West (12%),  areas, whereas there are only 1% of them in Northern Ireland.

What are they all doing? 

According to the Labour Force Survey 2015 the proportion of freelancers in different occupations is:

  • 68% of artistic, literary and media workers
  • 40% of those who work in sport and fitness
  • 35% of managers and proprietors
  • 32% of those who work in design occupations
  • 21% of therapists
  • 17% of health-care workers
  • 15% of business research & admin workers
  • 13% of IT workers
  • 12% of business & finance workers
  • 11% of engineers
  • 9% of functional management & directors
  • 9% of sales & marketing workers
  • 8% of teachers & those working in education
  • 8% of those working in public services

A year ago I wrote about people on zero-hour contracts and the gap between power workers and those on basic pay. This issue has not gone away with HMRC currently taking an interest in several companies which pay less than the minimum wage.

 

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Motivating yourself needs the right words

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pushing_someone_to_the_edge_of_custom_text_13242Pretty much everyone knows about using self talk to help improve self-control. It’s become a staple of most self-improvement books and life coaches as well as sports coaches. But it turns out that the form of words you use can make a big difference.

An interesting series of experiments reported in the BPS’s Psychology magazine found that speaking to yourself in the second person i.e. “You can do it” was more effective than speaking to yourself in the first person i.e. “I can do it“.

Not only did the participants in the study who used the second person encouragement complete more problems, they also said they would be happier doing them again in future.

Why would there be this difference? The researchers speculate that when the going gets tough using the second person self-talk cues memories of being encouraged and supported by others, even back to childhood.

The experiments weren’t perfect relying on psychology students and written self-talk in relation to solving anagrams and planning to do more exercise. But it’s something to think about if you’re in the coaching business (and not too late to start encouraging your kids!).