psychometrics

So exactly what criteria should we actually use for recruitment now?

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Employers are realising that students with better grades or degrees aren’t necessarily the best performers (and for that I blame the devaluing of degrees and A levels in attempts to attract more students or get more brownie points. You can no longer trust a degree classification).

And in the march to more social diversity it seems you can forget about spells working abroad, being in a sports team, or having a good internship. Now I can see how the latter would disadvantage people from lower socio-economic groups but where do you draw the line?

Do you want token ethnic minority or working class or female employees just to look good? Do you want to be a social engineer or just employ the best people?

I read about a consultancy firm recently that had changed its recruitment process by excluding from CVs the following information:

  • Academic achievements
  • Work experience

They claim such blind CVs led to almost 20% more candidates in its graduate and school leaver intake who would previously have been ineligible. So what are they actually using as criteria?

And this approach has been tried decades ago leaving off the name of the school, the marital status, age etc to try and level the playing field. But then you still have to get through interviews.

We all know interviews are notoriously unreliable partly because of the way candidates present themselves and how attractive they are. But they could be better if interviewers, and candidates for that matter, were trained properly.

Recent research from the US suggests that highly qualified candidates are three times more likely to get a job if they are honest about their shortcomings as they come across as more authentic. Of course whether it works for less qualified or less competent candidates is a different matter.  Candidates often lie about their skills or experience (between 2/3 and 9/10 if research is to be believed).

Psychometrics including aptitude and situational tests are more reliable than interviews – but you need specialist expertise to use them.

Assessment centres are more reliable predictors with multiple tasks for candidates and multiple trained raters. But again you need the expertise to do it and they are expensive to set up when most companies want a quick and easy solution.

Companies are trying a range of things to attract more diverse applicants but diversity isn’t necessarily a good thing for the business in every situation as research shows.

Leadership capabilities necessary for a successful merger

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puzzle_people_working_together_1600_wht_6984Growing through mergers and acquisitions is a common strategy but the sad truth is that 40-80% of mergers fail to meet their objectives.

A study of 94 mergers by a Washington-based consultancy firm Potentious found that, using the Korn-Ferry 360 degree evaluations, the following leadership capabilities were the key to success.

 

In the acquiring company

Motivate others
Influence others
Build relationships
Develop others
Act with integrity
Show adaptability
Focus on customer needs

In the target company

Motivate others
Influence others
Build relationships
Provide direction

The findings are based on a five year study using a range of financial indices as well as the 360 data.

Although there is an overlap in the capabilities for both organisations the study revealed that they were more important in achieving success at senior level in the acquiring company but at middle management level in the target company.

I wonder if this is because senior executives in the target company are more likely to be demoralised or worried about their future whereas middle managers might see it as an opportunity?

Cary Cooper and colleagues did some research in the UK into mergers and acquisitions back in the late 1980s and found that morale and productivity (what we would now call employee engagement) often took 12 – 18 months to recover after a merger or takeover.

Based on these findings the author of the study, J Keith Dunbar, proposes that :

assessing the collective leadership capabilities should be part of the due diligence carried out before any merger, and
that the middle managers at the target companies, who are crucial to success, should be offered contracts which will keep them there”

Source: HBR September 2014

Your partner’s personality adds value

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business_man_and_woman_1600_wht_5662Successful people are more likely to have a partner with certain personality traits according to a 5-year study at Washington University in St Louis, Missouri.

These traits, which help their partners to be advance their careers are: conscientiousness, reliability, and diligence.

These are the traits commonly found in successful executives with conscientiousness linked to success in life generally i.e. you do what you say you’ll do.

The study examined 5,000 married couples aged between 19 and 80 years of age and tracked them over 5 years to see how well they did at work. They also asked them to describe their partners.

Those who progressed the most in their chosen occupation had a spouse who scored high in conscientiousness, regardless of sex.

The author of the study, Joshua Jackson, talking about the results said “ It is not only your own personality that influences the experiences that lead to greater occupational success, but that your spouse’s personality matters too”.

He said it’s not just about your spouse encouraging you to ask for a pay rise or promotion but the influence of your spouse’s daily behaviour which influences you over time.

Conscientiousness can mean a spouse sharing the domestic chores or emulating the other person’s personality traits making them reliable and diligent employees.

This is where HR has been getting it wrong! Instead of using personality questionnaires to assess the applicant they should be inviting the applicants’ spouses in for assessment as well. Of course that doesn’t help if the applicant doesn’t have one – unless they borrow one for the occasion from a successful friend.

Personality Neuroscience: Unlocking The Mystery of The Brain in Order to Understand The Whole Person

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Brought to my attention via Dr Mark’s Business Psychology blog

Fresh Perspectives on Psychometrics & Psychology

Brain painting

This month, President Obama unveiled plans to fund a $100 million project to discover how different regions of the brain connect and result in the many complex functions that we as human beings are capable of. The BRAIN initiative, similar in its audacious attempt to push the boundaries of human knowledge as the Human Genome project, will endeavour to discover more about the most complex structure in the universe.

So, I was inspired to reconnect with my neuroscience roots myself and through a recommendation of our very own Psyche Editor; Mr Starkey, came across the intriguing field of ‘Personality Neuroscience’. The aim of this field, is “to understand both the biological systems that are responsible for the states associated with [personality] traits and the parameters of those systems that cause them to function differently in different individuals” (DeYoung, 2010).  A leading figure within Personality Neuroscience is Dr Colin DeYoung, who…

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