Engineering Employers Federation

Stress – it never really went away

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CNV00032_2_2We thought it had. There were fewer offerings from stress management experts with a shift of emphasis to developing resilience and sickness absence rates dropped.

Alas the fear of losing your job makes people attend work more diligently (even when they shouldn’t) and the resulting “presenteeism” masks rising levels of mental health problems.

The Engineering Employers Federation (which I used to know well as at one time I was their stress management expert in the North West) surveyed 350 companies involving 90,000 workers. They found that only 1 in 10 companies provided training for managers on mental health issues. So they found a market for it – if companies were really interested.

Two fifths of the companies said long-term absence rates were increasing even though absence overall was low at 2.2% i.e. 5 days per employee a year on average. In fact half of the workers never took any time off sick.

Back problems (musculo-skeletal) are still the main cause of long-term absence overall but for a quarter of the companies stress and mental health disorders were the main cause.

These are still considered the most difficult to deal with in adjusting work to meet the employees’ needs.

The EEF’s Chief Medical Adviser says GPs should be given the tools  to deal with stress and mental health issues in the same way they deal with other medical problems.

What about companies taking more interest in their employees’ wellbeing and making an effort to combat the causes of work-based stress?

We don’t want to go the way of America where stress is considered the norm and work-life balance is now work-life merge (thanks largely to high flying female executives).

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